Posts Tagged ‘Network Security’

As I read through the news on the Ebay breach, I got to thinking,  it’s not just the Ebay account informationEbay you have to worry about, rather ANY other account that matches.

For instance you can log into Ebay with either your email address, or userID. Now let’s say you are using the same email address and password for PayPal, Amazon, Facebook, YouTube, WordPress, Twitter, or some other fairly popular public site.

Since the hackers stole your information from Ebay, they could simply troll through other sites on the web with your login information, and see if the door opens.

Change All Your Passwords!You do not need to be a brain surgeon to put two and two together.  So after you change your Ebay account password, do the same for your other accounts.

Written by: Francesco Trama, CEO, PacketViper

 

Since the UN Identified this back in February, do you think the infections have spread, or have been curtailed? I would say with near certainty they have grown exponentially like a plague in every direction uncontrollably.  Here in the US we are finding it difficult to manage our own break outs, even though at times we can slow the growth. Now imagine the “up and coming” tech areas to our south, still getting their “%^&*” together.

By no means am I saying “we” (US) has theirs together, I just consider us further along is all.

Given they are still in their “tech growing phase” these or any under developed tech areas should be considered high risk, and treated with higher scrutiny and limited how your networks are exposed to these areas.

By Francesco Trama

 

Explainer: Cybercrime in Latin America

” Illegal botnets, or networks of remote-controlled computers infected with malware, have been found throughout Latin America. Also known as “zombie computers,” these networks can be used for a variety of cybercrimes, ranging from stealing personal information to sending spam. Trustnet’s study found that nearly half of all global cybercrime takes place through remote access with methods like botnets.

Cybercriminals from anywhere in the world can control the botnets through command and control servers, or C&Cs. A February 2013 UN draft report identified significant clusters of C&Cs in the Caribbean basin, as well as Central America. Two types of malware spawned zombie computers in the region last year—one called Dorkbot that infected 80,000 computers in 10 Latin American countries, the other called the Flashback virus, which harmed 40,000 Latin American computers.”

Source: http://www.as-coa.org/articles/explainer-cybercrime-latin-america

The Pittsburgh Post Gazette, a local paper wrote a small blurb on what PacketViper is doing to improve network security environments.   During the interview we disabled PacketViper and took a picture of a Barracuda Spam Filter which was being protected. As you can see in the photo, a huge spike in traffic immediately appeared, signifying it was processing 400x the amount of traffic prior to disabling PacketViper, our Geo IP Network Filter.

The thinking for per port Geo IP is simple, does every country need access to every port, or does your environment really have to process every network request from the world? Before you answer yes so quickly.  Think about that question. Technically, doesn’t your firewalls, IDS, or IPS systems look for malicious traffic an drop it?  So the answer is undoubtedly no. The idea all exposed ports have to be accessible from all corners of the world is unfathomable, and perplexing to me.

The fact is globally exposed ports have always been a weakness in all security designs today. Sure we can lessen the the risk with strong password policies, intense scrutiny using algorithmic analysis, or secure portals to name some methods. But who’s protecting the secure portals log in pages, or if the attacker changes their pattern, a patch is not applied immediately, or rule is fat fingered? If I’m an attacker, I’m finding some other method then a well beaten path to breach you.

So again, why should the globe have access to ports used for key employees, target customers, or vendors?  Per port Geo IP filters like PacketViper, can surgically restrict specific ports to and from any country bi-directionally, there by alleviating the pressure through your security environment, while hardening security, without restricting your bushiness globally.

I sometimes wonder if we got so smart in threat detection, we have over looked the basic persistent problem of opening ports through our firewalls, and allowing anyone with a smart phone, or computer access.

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By: Francesco Trama

As I sit driving back from Chicago thinking about everyone we met at ASIS, and the excitement from the new customers we signed on.  It’s nice to see something you believe in, and worked so hard on is appreciated and beneficial to our customers. PacketViper is the solution every one has been missing because it solves simply a big network security problem.

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By Francesco Trama

Its nice talking to customer and seeing them get the benefit of a Geo IP filter that eliminates unwanted traffic at the gateway before hitting their security environment.  Benefit and point being would you rather have your security environment filter millions of connections, or hundreds of thousands.

Wouldn’t it be nice instead of getting thousand of proxy port scans a day, you get a handful?  That”s one small thing we do well.

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Technology has always been something I enjoyed being a part of. Each corner I turn brings something new and exciting. My day to day keeps me busy, challenged, and feeling you are a part of a family all working towards the same goal. This motivates me to do great things for our company. Viper Network Systems has been the catalyst which has made me dive deep into network security, and today’s practices.

PacketViper was something, which churned in my head for many years while managing networks. Something I believed was a necessary piece in network security. I never understood why no one would take on this challenge sooner.

Luckily, I stayed focused, asked questions, connected with the right people, and now it’s reality. I’m looking forward to the next few years!